In Nashville, Sharing COVID Data With Police Raises Fears Among Blacks, Immigrants – Digital Privacy News

Critics of sharing information about those who are COVID-positive with police and other first responders say it’s a privacy breach that disproportionally affects African Americans and other people of color. “It’s a perfect storm,” Craig Klugman, professor of bioethics and health humanities at DePaul University in Chicago, told Digital Privacy News. “There’s a lot of distrust out there.”

‘Dreamers’ Live in Fear of ICE Accessing Data as SCOTUS Weighs DACA’s Fate – Digital Privacy News

Arizona resident Jose Ramos (not his real name) came to the United States from Mexico with his family when he was 8 years old. In 2013, when he was 18, he obtained deportation protection under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. He was in his first semester of community college. In his DACA application, Ramos gave his address and other personal information to U.S. Customs and Immigration Services (USCIS).

Kids, adults form special bond through Mitchell County mentoring program

Osage High School graduate Emma Williams was in second grade when her father was diagnosed with ALS. At her mother’s request, she was partnered with an adult mentor, Kris Lewis, through the Bridges Mentoring program. Williams, now a third-year student at Wartburg College in Waverly studying graphic design and studio art, aged out of formal participation in the mentoring program when she turned 18. However, she still goes to see Lewis every time she goes home.
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